Do You Think Global Warming Is Exaggerated

Global Warming Is Exaggerated - For & Against

Half Of Americans Believe Global Warming Is Exaggerated, Study Finds

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Even as most Americans report experiencing weather conditions lately, more than four in 10 say the seriousness of global warming is generally exaggerated in the news. These sentiments are lower than the record 48% who believed this four years ago, but higher than any year before Barack Obama became president.

Likely to Say Global Warming Is Exaggerated” | My Trip To The Amazon

More Than 4 in 10 Say Seriousness of Global Warming Is Exaggerated

Results from a are rather depressing. Based on telephone interviews with a sample of 1,012 Americans, more Americans think that the reporting on global warming is exaggerated than think its seriousness is under-estimated (41% vs. 28%). This looks like a real change since it wasn’t that long ago (2006) that the numbers were reversed. Political party affiliation helps predict how people feel about global warming. Nearly two-thirds of self-reported Republican respondents (66%) think that news reports on global warming are exaggerated. This is up from 35% in 1998, when Gallop started surveys on global warming.

Who Believe the Seriousness of Global Warming Is Generally Exaggerated

And though wide ideological differences remain, both liberals and conservatives are more likely now than they were in 2008 to believe the seriousness of global warming is exaggerated in the news.

‘now say global warming is exaggerated’ | Watts Up With That


Nearly half of the public (48 percent) think that the seriousness of global warming is generally exaggerated, up from 41 percent in 2009 and 31 percent in 1997, when Gallup first asked the question. Gallup noted that the percentage of Americans who believe global warming is generally overblown is the highest on its record.PRINCETON, NJ -- Gallup's annual update on Americans' attitudes toward the environment shows a public that over the last two years has become less worried about the threat of global warming, less convinced that its effects are already happening, and more likely to believe that scientists themselves are uncertain about its occurrence. In response to one key question, 48% of Americans now believe that the seriousness of global warming is generally exaggerated, up from 41% in 2009 and 31% in 1997, when Gallup first asked the question.Opinions about global warming vary by party identification, with Democrats typically than Republicans about global warming and its potentially harmful effects on the environment. Democrats are most likely to say the seriousness of global warming is generally underestimated in the news, with about half (49%) saying so. Another 32% of Democrats believe reports about global warming are generally correct. Less than one-fifth (18%) find that the seriousness of global warming is generally exaggerated.Opinions about global warming vary by party identification, with Democrats typically than Republicans about global warming and its potentially harmful effects on the environment. Democrats are most likely to say the seriousness of global warming is generally underestimated in the news, with about half (49%) saying so. Another 32% of Democrats believe reports about global warming are generally correct. Less than one-fifth (18%) find that the seriousness of global warming is generally exaggerated.There are similarly large party differences on whether the seriousness of global warming is exaggerated. Two-thirds of Republicans, compared with 25% of Democrats, hold this view. All three groups are more likely now than they were in 2008 to believe the news media exaggerate the seriousness of the issue, including a sharp 19-point increase among independents. As a result, independents' views on this matter are now closer to Republicans' than to Democrats'.